Students might have been eligible for extra aid from Savannah State University depending on the way they paid for their tuition. 

The CARES Act is the name of the $2 trillion coronavirus response bill that Congress passed to help keep the United States afloat. The name CARES stands for Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security, and it applies to several parts of the economy including businesses, individuals, local governments and educational institutions. 

Historically Black institutions will get more than was allocated to other institutions, as well, through some other funding sources. The money is to help keep the universities afloat after giving refunds and paying staff and faculty for online schooling, among other challenges. However, much of the money is meant to be disbersed to college students directly for relief. 

At Savannah State University, this means that about half ($3.18 million) of the $6.37 million allocated to the school through the CARES Act is specifically designated for emergency aid grants for students. 

Federal Aid Disbursement to Colleges

Screenshot from a database of schools with the total disbursement amount and the amount designated specifically to aid students. 

Each college and university can disburse the money in different ways so that the most pressed students can use it on materials they may need for online classes such as a laptop. The grant money can also be used on housing, healthcare, and child care, according to the Department of Education. The administration determines which students qualify to receive the grant money. 

Taylor Johnson, a full-time student at Savannah State University, said she benefited from the grant money at the school. “Being a college student and not qualifying for a stimulus or unemployment check, I am really thankful for this money. It is a true blessing," she said.

Johnson said she is financially dependent on her parents. 

“I chose not to work during the semester so that I can dedicate my time to my studies," she said. 

Some students do not qualify for the university grant money. Imani Muhammad, a senior biology major at Savannah State Univeristy did not recieve a check, “According to financial aid, since I don’t receive financial assistance from the school, I don’t qualify.”

Savannah State’s Financial Aid office stated that for students to receive a check, the student must be a full-time student and have filed their FAFSA and must be a financial aid recipient.

Muhammad said, “I am on scholarships and I pay out-of-pocket for school also, so I guess the school does not really see a need for me receiving the money.”

Students who attend a college or university should check with their specific financial office for the CARES Act Grant qualifications.

Many college students are stuck without the aid from the federal government because they're still being claimed as dependents by their parents, and if they aren't getting financial aid, they won't get the grant from the school.

The Department of Revenue released stimulus checks of up to $1,200 to the public. In order to qualify for a stimulus check, a person must have filed their 2019 taxes as an independent. Secondly, $75,000 for individuals if their filing status was single or married filing separately, $112,500 for head of household filers and $150,000 for married couples filing joint returns.

The Department of Labor also released unemployment checks up to $600 if you were temporarily asked to resign a job due to COVID-19. This also has a negative impact on college students because some students choose not to work while in school because it can be overwhelming.

Students who are enrolled as full time students at a university or a college have received up to $1,200 due to the CARES Act Grant. This is a $6 billion dollar grant split and sent to all colleges and universities nationwide. The colleges and universities disburse the money in different ways so that students can use it on materials they may need for online classes such as a laptop. The grant money can also be used on housing, healthcare, and child care. Administration determines which students qualify to receive the grant money.

 

Taylor Johnson, a full-time student at Savannah State University, expressed how much she benefited from the CARES Act Grant. “Being a college student and not qualifying for a stimulus or unemployment check, I am really thankful for this money. It is a true blessing.” Taylor also expressed that she does not work so she is financially dependent upon her parents, “I chose not to work during the semester so that I can dedicate my time to my studies.”

 

Even though the CARES Act Grant money was disbursed to all colleges and universities nationwide, some students do not necessarily qualify. Imani Muhammad, a senior biology major at Savannah State Univeristy did not recieve a check, “According to financial aid, since I don’t receive financial assistance from the school, I don’t qualify.” Savannah State’s Financial Aid office requests that in order for students to receive a check, the student must be a full-time student and have applied for fafsa and must be a financial aid recipient. Imani says, “I am on scholarships and I pay out of pocket for school also, so I guess the school does not really see a need for me receiving the money.” Again, the administration makes all the decisions concerning the grant disbursement to students. Students who attend a college or university should check with their specific financial office for the CARES Act Grant qualifications.

 

As many people may know, The United States is currently under a nationwide quarantine due to the newfound deadly virus, Coronavirus, which is now being called COVID-19. Following this quarantine, restaurants, stores, schools, etc. were required to follow the same agenda by closing all of these locations temporarily. While a lot of individuals are suffering, college students are said to be suffering the most.

 

College students received the worst end of the stick due to the fact the majority of students are still being claimed as dependents.

 

The Department of Revenue released stimulus checks of up to $1,200 to the public. In order to qualify for a stimulus check, a person must have filed their 2019 taxes as an independent. Secondly, $75,000 for individuals if their filing status was single or married filing separately, $112,500 for head of household filers and $150,000 for married couples filing joint returns.

 

The Department of Labor also released unemployment checks up to $600 if you were temporarily asked to resign a job due to COVID-19. This also has a negative impact on college students because some students choose not to work while in school because it can be overwhelming.

 

COVID-19 a.k.a Coronavirus has seriously impacted the economy. At the beginning of April, the number of cases were at its peak hitting 40,000+ cases nationwide. As of May 1st, the number has dropped by 7,000, leaving 33,000 COVID-19 cases nationwide. There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease. The best way to prevent becoming another case is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The virus is thought to spread airborne and from person-to-person.

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