Camille Beasley, 13, and her mother Tamara Wright

Camille Beasley, 13, and her mother Tamara Wright monitor the table display for their bookstore at Covington's Juneteenth parade.

For generations, African-American families have celebrated Juneteenth, the day that commemorates the emancipation of enslaved people in America. This summer, President Joe Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act, making it an official federal holiday.

Across the country families and communities celebrated with parades, festivals, feasts and remembrances. 

Camille Beasley, 13, of Covington, Georgia, said she’s been celebrating Juneteenth since “I was a kid.” 

She said the most important thing she can do on Juneteenth is celebrate. She and her mother attended a parade on Juneteenth and promoted their African-American bookstore. 

Juneteenth is also known as Jubilee Day and Black Independence Day. It’s been celebrated on June 19 since 1865. 

Across the country families and communities celebrated with parades, festivals, feasts and remembrances. 

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